I'm Paul Caputo, a UK based wine merchant and writer. On this site you'll find my collection of wine writings (long and short) and examples of my work. Curious? Please feel free to get in touch.....

Region Guide: Burgundy, France

Aloxe-Corton | Auxey-Duresses | Bâtard-Montrachet | Beaune | Bienvenues-Bâtard-Montrachet | Blagny | | Bourgogne | Bourgogne aligoté | Bourgogne clairet | Bourgogne clairet Côte chalonnaise | Bourgogne Coulanges-la-Vineuse | Bourgogne Côte Saint-Jacques | Bourgogne Coulanges-la-Vineuse | Bourgogne Côtes d’Auxerre | Bourgogne Côtes du Couchois | Bourgogne Epineuil | Bourgogne grand ordinaire | Bourgogne Hautes-côtes de Beaune | Bourgogne Hautes-côtes de Nuits | Bourgogne La Chapelle Notre-Dame | Bourgogne le Chapitre | Bourgogne Montrecul | Bourgogne mousseux | Bourgogne ordinaire | Bourgogne | Passe-tout-grains | Bourgogne Vézelay | Bourgogne rosé | | Chablis AOC | Chambertin AOC | Chambertin-Clos-de-Beze | Chambolle-Musigny AOC | Chapelle-Chambertin AOC | Charlemagne AOC | Charmes-Chambertin AOC | Chassage-Montrachet AOC | Chevalier-Montrachet AOC | Corey-les-Beaune AIC
Clos des Lambrays
Clos de la Roche
Clos de Tart
Clos de Vougeot
Clos Saint-Denis
Corton
Corton-Charlemagne
Côte de Beaune
Côte de Beaune-Villages
Côte de Nuits-villages
Côtes du Forez
Crémant de Bourgogne
Criots-Bâtard-Montrachet
Échezeaux
Fixin
Gevrey-Chambertin
Grands Échezeaux
Griotte-Chambertin
Irancy
Ladoix
La Grande Rue
La Romanée
La Tâche
Latricieres-Chambertin

Maranges
Marsannay
Mazis-Chambertin
Mazoyeres-Chambertin

Meursault
Montagny
Monthelie
Montrachet
Morey-Saint-Denis
Nuits-Saint-Georges
Pernand-Vergelesses
Pommard

Puligny-Montrachet AOC
Richebourg
Romanée-Conti
Romanée-Saint-Vivant
Ruchottes-Chambertin
Saint-Aubin
Saint-Bris
Saint-Romain
Santenay
Savigny-les-Beaune
Tonnerre
Vins Fins de la Côte de Nuits

Volnay
Volnay Santenots
Vosne-Romanée
Vougeot

Chablis: Petit Chablis AOC | Chablis AOC

Cote de Beaune (Cote d'Or):

Cote de Nuits (Cote d'Or): Volnay

Cote Chalonnaise: Bouzeron AOC | Givry AOC | Mercurey AOC | Rully AOC

For a long time the Cote Chalonnaise has been overlooked in favour of the region's more illustrious names and appellations. While it might be true to say that compared with the very best, the Cote Chalonnaise has less to offer, it certainly has the potential to be a source of decent off the beaten path Burgundy, especially if budgets rule out some of the glitzier domains anyway.

The Mâconnais: Macon AOC | Mâcon supérieur AOC | Mâcon-villages AOC | Pouilly-Fuisse AOC | Pouilly-Loché | Pouilly-Vinzelles AOC | Saint-Véran AOC | Viré-Clessé AOC

Beaujolais: Beaujolais AOC


Burgundy is part myth, part legend, part cunnundrum. Regardless of its undoubted paradoxes, it is capable of producing some of the greatest red and white wines in the world. It can also offer a lifetime of study and for the serious wine geek, there is no place on earth like it. The amount of single vineyards that have been officially recognised as grand cru, premier cru, or even as high quality sites known as climats is overwhelming.

So, where to start? Burgundy encompasses five basic regions that differ stylistically and help us to identify wine styles. These are Chablis in the north of the region, the Cote d'Or which is understood in reference to two hillsides covered in a patchwork of vines known as the Cote de Beune and the Cote de Nuits. To the west their is the Cote Chalonais which remains a largely undiscovered area, while heading south there is the Mâconnais. Finally, to the far south there is Beaujolais.


When it comes to classifying individual sites there are two classifications to look out for.

Premier Cru: This will appear as the name of the village and the name of the vineyard classified as premier cru. There are 585 premier cru vineyards in the Côte d'Or and Côte Chalonnaise. These represent around 18% of Burgundy's total production.

Grand Cru: Only the name of the vineyard will appear on its own. This can be confusing because some of the grand cru names (Chambertin, Montrachet, Musigny) appear as part of a village name (see above). There are 32 Grand Cru vineyards in the Côte d'Or. They represent less than 5% of production.