The Power Broker: Robert Moses and the Fall of New York by Robert E. Caro Over 1000 pages on navigating the checks and balances of the New York state political machine. It may sound heavy, but it's absolutely thrilling and hard to put down. The review pages feature a who's who of reputable publications, praising a work of magnitude and importance. There is more than enough information online to render me adding to it a pointless exercise. Crucially though, we see a man who struggles to find his place in society until well into his 30s. On the brink of career and financial obscurity, a slice of luck helps him land a job at the bottom of the political ladder before a combination of hard work and ruthless belief in what he wants to achieve propels Robert Moses forward. It is of course a cautionary tale.

The Art of War by Tsun Zsu: I sort of cringed when adding this to the list. I can't help but feel that many of the ideas in here have permeated much of the principles we know about. It's a must read, but it's such a well pedalled text I'm sure you've either already read it, or indeed decided you don't want to. We've probably picked up so many of the concepts anyway from books and films to the point where reading it probably feels a little bit like stating the obvios. Perhaps I include it here with an eye on applied reflection.